Computer Vision Syndrome Overview

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a growing problem. A majority of Americans use a computer either at work, at school or at home.

This majority increasingly includes children of younger ages who are vulnerable to eye damage that affects adults to a far lesser degree, if at all.


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Although more and more studies are being done to identify the causes and impact of CVS on computer users, there is a lack of awareness of the need to consult an eye specialist trained in treating CVS.

One of the biggest differences between working on a computer and working on paper is the nature of screen-image text and graphics.

Images on paper are fixed. Text has crisp lines, and artwork blends smoothly. Neither have properties that vary in ways that force the eyes to continually refocus.

Screen images are made up of pixels of light. Within each pixel the light intensity can vary, and tends to fade at the edges of the pixel. This forces the eyes to refocus constantly, resulting in eyestrain and other symptoms of CVS.

Take a look at these articles for information about the different aspects that make up CVS.

(CVS): What it CVS? What are its symptoms, causes and remedies?

  • Computer vision syndrome and fatigue: How children are affected by CVS and eye fatigue. Why CVS effects are more serious for children than for adults.
  • Computer eye strain: What it is, what causes it, how to prevent it.
  • Computer glasses: While computer eye glasses can be purchased at an office supply store, eye doctors recommend that anyone using a computer have an initial eye exam before starting to use their computer.
  • Computer ergonomics: Aches and pains related to your workstation. How your computer equipment, room and workstation contributes to CVS, and how to rearrange your equipment and room to minimize the risk of CVS.
  • Computer productivity: Productivity is affected by CVS to a very significant degree. Some remarkable studies show almost an 18:1 return on investment for employers who pay for employees’ computer glasses.
  • Return From Computer Vision Syndrome to Home